Additional trailers make large trucks more dangerous

Additional trailers make large trucks more dangerous

Seeing one tractor-trailer swaying on the highway may make a fellow Kentucky motorist nervous. However, when there are two or three trailers on the same truck, it may be even more nerve-wracking to try to pass. There is good reason for extra caution: These combination vehicles are actually more dangerous.

Not every state allows double and triple trailers, but Online-CDL-test.com notes that it is legal in Kentucky. Because of the dangers, a special test is required in addition to the one that all commercial vehicle operators must take to get their license.

TruckingTruth.com explains that this test includes knowledge to handle quite a few things that are more likely to go wrong when pulling two or three trailers. For example, combination vehicles are much more likely to roll over in nonemergency situations. A routine corner can tip trailers if the driver is going at the same speed as someone pulling only one trailer.

When a sudden traffic issue does arise, combination vehicles are much more difficult to maneuver. Drivers cannot just slam on their brakes or swerve to miss a slowing vehicle in front of the truck. They must look far down the road to be prepared for any such emergency. Lengthy following distance is needed at all times, and especially during inclement weather or adverse conditions when traction is an issue.

Every time there is a new connecting component involved, there is more danger of trailers uncoupling. Even though it may be tempting to rush through the process, drivers must check every connection carefully before each day’s trip to prevent a catastrophic accident.

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